#SuzyPFW: A Poetic Play on Colour

Palette perfect at Haider Ackermann

The swirling mist evaporated and colours emerged into the light – aquamarine, blush pink, amethyst – shades that hovered between sweet and sharp.

Haider Ackermann had come back to his heartland which is complexity made to appear simple with both drapes and shades of colour. The models, as ever, moved through the space as though lost in a distant world.

To say that declination of colour is the designer’s strength might sound patronising. But not when these artistic shades are so central to his meaning: to give a touch of mystery to everything he presents.

Throughout the show, Lou Reed’s gravelly song Vanishing Act got to the heart of the matter. “It must be nice to disappear – float into a mist,” sang the rock musician capturing with his words – as with Haider’s clothes – a desire to retreat from this tough world.

“We are going through strange times so I wanted to have this fragility – but really something very uplifting,” the designer said.

“It’s tough – but at the same time – there was a kind of happiness, due to the colour.”

So, what about that extraordinary palette of unconventional colours drawn from the edges and creases of the spectrum?

“I don’t know why I’m choosing my colours, it’s just intuition,” Haider said. And while the clothes seemed familiar, the colour cast its spell.

Olivier Theyskens’ texture and colour

Treating black as a colour has always been a principle of Olivier Theyskens, who can mix lace with leather platform boots and create just the right kind of eruption to the fragility of his work.

Even all that black in textures from satin to leather was still not enough for the delicacy of the designer whose big, black woollen sweater seemed to evaporate below the hips into lace.

After shaking off the dark and turning on the lightness of white, Theyskens began to play with colour, mixed with the sensuality of the designs.

The magic was in the gentleness of the colours: lettuce green for a slim velvet dress, cut on the bias to end at mid-calf. Or an even lighter rain-washed sky blue to follow after another dose of black. Then a dash of deep green, a pause for black, wine red and scarlet.

All this comes after a retrospective of Theyskens’ work in Antwerp last year. The designer has not moved so far from his own fashion tree – but his work is charming.